09 September 2012

Stump Thumpin, Chaga, & Strop Fungus

Since I'm traveling again next week and I've been itching to get some woods time, I had to get out.

I wanted to do some more preseason scouting, hammer some stumps, collect some chaga and find a Razor Strop (Piptoporus betulinus) fungus to make a new strop with.

With longbow in hand and my favorite pack I hit the woods.









































This is the Piptoporus betulinus I decided to collect for the new strop I am making. I'll cut it to shape, affix it to a comfortable wood backing. I've found they work great as a strop, and in a pinch they also work as antiseptic bandages.























I've become a big fan of these VPA small game heads. I use the 200gr versions as I'm running very heavy arrows and these help me get a good weight FOC, they hit like freight trains and my arrow flight is awesome. They've become my favorite target and small game heads and they weigh exactly what my broad heads weigh. I deviated from my usual cedars this year as I wanted to try some carbons. I'm using 75/95 GT Traditional shafts at a little over 11gr an inch, full length 32" and 100gr brass inserts. Total arrow weight is just over 650grs.















































This is a bed I found on the way out, it has seen a lot of use. It's a little small for moose but way too big for whitetail.











I used that strop fungus, below is what it looks like so far. Still got some pretty-up work to do but it works just fine.



Hope you folks have a great season!

11 comments:

  1. Looks like autumn is arriving in Minnesota, too. The fungi certainly seem to be out in full force. :)

    Beautiful photography as always, AG.

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  2. Sure does look good again!
    Never knew there were arrowheads like the ones you showed. So instead of relying on a piercing action from the head, you kill small game by kinetic energy? Interesting. How does that effect the meat?
    Your first image is quit colourfull, I must say. ;)

    be carefull on the road!

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    1. Yep, the shock typical kills small game instantly. As for damage, I'd say less than piercing though it does cause hematoma. Typically I aim for the head, it's either a instant death or a clean miss and no meat damage. This is how I take most tree rats as it were.

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  3. Some great shots AG. Those were beautiful. I hope your travel time goes quick so you can get back out. Looks like your area is at the beginning of fall where everything changes daily. A great time to be in the woods.

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    1. Thanks man, hopefully this will be the only travel in September, it's my favorite time of year.

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  4. Beautiful pictures of the sun coming through trees. That is my favorite image when I am in the woods. I'm getting married at the end of the month so my woods time is tight for September too. Hoping it opens up in mid October (my favorite months are October and November here in the PNW).

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    1. Congratulations Gabe, many blessings to you and yours!

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  5. Thanks. That's nice of ya'. My first marriage after 40 years of being a bachelor.

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  6. Wow, wonderful pictures. You must really know alot about mushrooms and fungus. And nice shot! How far away was the stump?

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